NEW ATHENA SCIENCE REDEFINITION team Members

ESA has appointed in November 2022 a Science Re-definition Team that will support the definition, where necessary, of revised science objectives for NewAthena. The Science Re-definition Team will be asked to support the study activities in the necessary trade-offs among performance specifications, etc., with the goal of defining an affordable X-ray mission that will still afford flagship science. The Science Re-definition Team will be asked to support the Agency in the feasibility studies needed to define the NewAthena concept. It is currently envisaged to achieve the definition of the NewAthena concept in approximately 18 months. The Science Re-definition Team will be asked to produce, at the end of the study, a final report advising the Director of Science about the scientific value of the NewAthena concept. The Team may also be asked to produce interim reports to support the ongoing work of the agency.

The NewAthena Science Re-definition Team is independent of the instrument consortia that are baselined to supply instruments to the NewAthena mission (X-IFU and WFI). Its members are:

James Aird University of Edinburgh United Kingdom
Francisco Carrera CSIC-Universidad de Cantabria Spain
Elisa Costantini SRON, Netherlands Institute for Space Research The Netherlands
Lia Corrales University of Michigan USA (Deputy NASA representative)
Mike Cruise (co-Chair) University of Birmingham United Kingdom
Thomas Dauser University Erlangen-Nuremberg Germany
Dominique Eckart University of Geneva Switzerland
Matteo Guainazzi (co-Chair) European Space Agency ESA
Hironori Matsumoto University of Osaka Japan (JAXA representative)
Rachel Osten STScI USA (NASA representative)
Pierre Olivier Petrucci Institut de Planetologie et d'Astrophysqiue de Grenoble France
Delphine Porquet Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille France
Gabriel Pratt CEA Saclay - IRFU France
Nanda Rea Institute of Space Sciences (ICE-CSIC) Spain
Thomas Reiprich University of Bonn Germany
Aurora Simionescu SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research The Netherlands
Eleonora Troja University of Rome Tor Vergata Italy